How can I get very strong bones

Three steps to strong bones

Prof. Dr. Heike Bischoff-Ferrari, Head of the Center for Aging and Mobility, University of Zurich, and Professor of the Department of Rheumatology and the Institute for Physical Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (together with the IOF - International Osteoporosis Foundation), a readable brochure on the subject of exercise, vitamins and calcium Treatment for osteoporosis composed: "Three steps to strong bones".

The most important contents in bullet points ...

Calcium and protein

  • Calcium has various functions in the body. It is necessary for muscle contraction as well as a building block for bones. Natural sources of calcium, such as dairy products, sardines, and nuts, are the preferred sources of calcium and are preferable to those from supplements. They also provide high quality protein ...

  • People who have higher levels of vitamin D can absorb more calcium. In conjunction with vitamin D, a minimum intake of calcium of around 800 mg per day is therefore sufficient for most people. One can cover that amount of calcium with a daily dose of calcium-rich foods ...

  • Seniors with low protein intake are more prone to muscle wasting, sarcopenia (muscle wasting in old age), and frailty. All of this contributes to an increased risk of falls. Various clinical studies in elderly hip fracture patients have shown that protein supplements result in fewer deaths, shorter hospital stays, and a higher likelihood of returning to an independent life ...

Vitamin D

  • Vitamin D supports calcium absorption. It has a direct, stimulating effect on muscle tissue and bone density and reduces the risk of falls and fractures by around 20%. The main source is sunlight. Our skin can produce vitamin D by exposing it to sunlight. However, various factors can affect production in the skin ...

  • We take in around 20% of our vitamin D requirement from food. Particularly good sources are oily fish such as salmon, eel, and herring, as well as eggs and liver. Vitamin D status assessment should only be considered in people at serious risk of deficiency ...

Move

  • Exercise at any age strengthens bones and helps reduce the risk of fractures later in life. Studies show higher bone density in people who exercise regularly compared to people who do not exercise. Exercise before age 40 has been linked to lower risk of falls in the elderly ...

  • Prolonged immobilization, for example through bed rest, leads to a rapid loss of bone mass and an increased susceptibility to fractures. Have medium to high, intensive aerobic training under stress (e.g. brisk walking, hiking, climbing stairs or jogging), high-intensity, progressive resistance training (lifting weights) and "high impact" training under stress (e.g. jumping or jumping rope) show an increase in bone density of 1 to 4% per year in women before and after menopause ...

  • Fast, short, high-intensity impact movements and / or high-impact activities such as jogging, jumping and rope hopping stimulate the bone cells more than endurance sports involving low levels of stress, such as walking. Aerobic activities that do not take place under stress (such as swimming or cycling) do not increase bone density ...

Tip: Please see the link to the download at the top right!

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Page updated: 04/18/2021