When do I can or could use

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Gippendale



Registration date: 13.09.2006
Posts: 2

Posted: Sep 13, 2006 17:28 Title: Can or could?

Hello!
I have the following question, which has not been resolved on the Internet even through intensive research:
How does the meaning of and differ? (That could be. <-> That could be! He could be the father. <-> He could be the father. Etc.)
It is clear to me that there is a present tense and a subjunctive second, but I still don't know to what extent the meanings differ from each other.
Thanks in advance!
Rubik's Cube
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Registration date: 08/05/2004
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Sabina



Registration date: 09/10/2006
Posts: 55
Place of residence: Hessen
Rubik's Cube
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Registration date: 08/05/2004
Posts: 754
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Sabina



Registration date: 09/10/2006
Posts: 55
Place of residence: Hessen
Posted: Sep 13, 2006 10:36 PM Subject:

No
Subjunctive is the form that is formed from the preterite stem of a verb, possibly with umlauts, and is used when either the subjunctive I does not differ from the indicative, the expressed is rather improbable or a wish, or one wants to distance oneself from it.
What

for one shape is ... hmm
In any case, there is "would" in the subjunctive II, so I would say that "could have" is the subjunctive for "had been able".
With "could have" one expresses the past very clearly, while the subjunctive II itself does not necessarily have to refer to the past, even if it is derived from the past tense

In general: the subjunctive is a verb mode, not a tense!
Rubik's Cube
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Sabina



Registration date: 09/10/2006
Posts: 55
Place of residence: Hessen
Posted: Sep 14, 2006 3:11 PM Subject:

Well, I guess you mean by that, that the subjunctive I is derived from the present tense and the subjunctive II is derived from the past tense stem!
Pemmican



Registration date: 03/22/2005
Posts: 65

Posted: Sep 15, 2006 1:21 PM Title: Konjunktive

Rubik's Cube wrote the following:
Let me look it up in the grammar book ...
I quote excerpts
"The present subjunctive is called subjunctive I, the past subjunctive subjunctive II"

argh it's too late to understand now, I'll deal with it tomorrow


Problem: As mentioned, the subjunctive is a "mode", not a "tense". In and of themselves, the terms Konjunktiv I and Konjunktiv II are therefore misleading: Every "tense" exists
a) in the indicative mode and
b) in the subjunctive mode:


Present:
Indicative: "He goes to school"
Subjunctive: "He's going to school"

Preterite:
Indicative: "He went to school"
Subjunctive: "He would go to school"

Perfect:
Indicative: "He went to school"
Subjunctive: "He went to school"

Past continuous:
Indicative: "He went to school"
Subjunctive: "He would have gone to school"


---> Problem: Since the subjunctive is not tied to the indicative form from which it is derived, one avoids terms such as "present subjunctive" and "subjunctive past perfect" and stupidly replaces them with subjunctive I and subjunctive II (although these are at least . are just as inappropriate).

The subjunctive I includes the present and perfect subjunctive, the II subjunctive that of the past and past perfect:

"He goes to school / He went to school"
---> Subjunctive I.

"He would go to school / He would have gone to school"
---> subjunctive II.


Best wishes
-Pemmican
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Sirius



Registration date: 04/29/2006
Posts: 180
Place of residence: Erlangen
Posted: Sep 19, 2006 1:26 PM Subject:

The difference is not always noticeable in terms of content:

Case 1:
He can be the father. (Indicative. The fact is that he can, and because "can" does not say that it is so, it can be different.)
He could be the father. (Potentialis: He can - or not.)

Case 2:
He could be the father if they ever had sex. (Unrealis: You didn't have, and so it can't be.)

Case 3:
"Oh Sophie, I could be the father of your future children!" (Optional: he is not - because there is none - but he would like to and hope so.)

Case 4:
"Could you please work a little faster ?!"
(Hortative, no subjunctive in terms of content, only formally)

Oh, that could be understood
wishes subjunctive
Sirius
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Gippendale



Registration date: 13.09.2006
Posts: 2

Posted: Sep 19, 2006 2:17 PM Subject:

So first of all thanks for the answers. Can or could I summarize that this is a rather complicated topic and that the answer to "Can or could?" reads: "It depends."
I am concerned with case 1 described by Sirius. Only I do not understand any difference in meaning from his explanation. Actually, my hope was an answer with the content, can means 50 to 50, could means <50 to> 50. (Probability that it is so.) With the result that with regard to a situation that has yet to be clarified and in which something can just as well be present as it cannot be present, "may be" is preferable to "could be" or the use of "could" is even wrong.
Gast77
guest





Posted: 02 May 2017 6:30 p.m. Title:

In my opinion, the difference is as follows:

"CAN" is about THE CAN. (= Can or cannot do [it] - If one cannot [something], then one could not [do it] even if one wanted to.)

"COULD", this is about assuming / knowing in advance that the ability is not in question, but the will.

So the question comes to my mind rightly:
"Don't you want to or can't you?"

So one could ask:
1. Can he / you be the father?
2. Does he / you not want or cannot he / you be the father?
3. B / is you / he the father?